Dr. Jessica Madden

Doctor's Appointment for Incontinence

Read how to make a doctor's appointment for incontinence and see if you can get free incontinence supplies through Aeroflow Urology.

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Introducing Ostomy Products


Introducing Ostomy Products


For years, Aeroflow Healthcare has offered quality medical products, equipment and services to patients across the nation. Now we are excited to announce that in addition to our already extensive list of product categories, Aeroflow will be offering ostomy products as well. Utilizing leading names in the industry such as Convatec, Hollister and Coloplast, Aeroflow’s ostomy division will provide full service assistance to patients with various types of ostomy procedures.

Patients with ostomy procedures can find that wading through the many various pieces of renewable equipment, including bags, wafers, adhesive and more, can be daunting. For patients dealing with difficult medical procedures which can require a great deal of lifestyle adjustment, managing your own supplies every month can be overwhelming. By working with a full service durable medical equipment provider, like Aeroflow Healthcare, a great deal of the stress of ostomy products can be alleviated for patients and their caregivers. This can be accomplished in a variety of avenues.

The most obvious difficulty of dealing with any renewable medical supplies would be the billing and insurance aspect. For a procedure such as ostomy, which requires supplies to be replaced daily, and replenished monthly, navigating insurance filing, copays, and supply allowable amounts can be stressful. Aeroflow Healthcare is equipped to file medical claims with most major insurances, including working with Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross Blue Shield, and most other commercial plans. Our staff can educate you on how many ostomy products you qualify for each month, ensuring that you get the supplies you need and are entitled to under your insurance, in many cases at little or no cost to you.

The other major difficulty ostomy patients face is managing your supply levels for all the various parts of managing an ostomy system. Rather than managing your own supplies, dealing with shipping, and risking running out of ostomy products, Aeroflow Healthcare can take the headache out of this process. Our trained supply staff will record what products you are using, make recommendations if desired, and even call you when you are due under your insurance for new supplies. We will then ship your ostomy supplies directly to your door, with no added fee for shipping and handling. This will allow patients to maximize not only their insurance but their personal time. Products are delivered securely and discretely to your home, nationwide.

Ostomy procedures can be a major lifestyle adjustment for both patients and caregivers, but they do not have to mean compromising your quality of life. While the circumstances requiring an ostomy cannot be controlled, the amount of effort required for patients and their caregivers can be managed. Dealing with a licensed, experienced, reputable company like Aeroflow Healthcare can take a great deal of the stress and hardship out of the process. If you or someone you know has a colostomy, ileostomy, or any other procedure requiring ostomy products, don’t delay! Contact Aeroflow Healthcare today and help get back on the road to independence and quality of life. Call us at 855-212-3211 to speak with a representative or fill out our qualify through insurance form.

Information provided on the Aeroflow Urology blog is not intended as a substitute to medical advice or care. Aeroflow recommends consulting your healthcare provider if you are experiencing medical issues relating to incontinence.

Choosing the Right Incontinence Products


Choosing the Right Incontinence Products


Of the many challenging health concerns which a person can deal with over the course of their life, few areas inconvenient and sensitive as incontinence.  Many people associate incontinence with advanced age, but that is hardly a requirement for the condition. Injuries, illness, and other factors can all contribute to patients suffering from varying degrees of incontinence.  Choosing the right incontinence product or products is absolutely critical when it comes to managing this difficult condition.

Choosing the right incontinence product comes down to 2 main questions. The first is the degree of incontinence present. Many patients have stress incontinence, the mildest and most manageable form, which in some cases, can be managed with simple bladder control pads, sometimes called poise pads. Other patients may have functional, urge, or other more severe types of incontinence. These will necessitate a higher degree of absorbency, no matter what type of product a patient chooses. The second question in choosing the right incontinence product is the overall type of product or products which will be used.

Many people equate incontinence treatment most strongly with adult disposable briefs, commonly referred to as diapers. Diapers often offer the highest degree of absorbency of all available incontinence products, making them an excellent choice for patients with heavy or severe incontinence. Diapers are adjusted on the sides using wings, a belt-like component, or most commonly, tabs. By using this adjustability, diapers can be tailored to a specific patient’s size and comfort. Diapers are frequently used cases where a patient may have a caregiver or be immobilized in some way. This is because diapers can be removed and changed without needing to remove pants or other clothing articles. This added convenience can make frequent changes more accommodating for both the patient and any caregiver or assistant they may have.

Patients who are more mobile and with light to moderate incontinence may choose adult disposable pull-ups, also called disposable underwear. Pull-ups function much in the way that traditional undergarments do, and can be pulled on over the legs and worn just like normal clothing articles. Since pants, shoes, and other clothing must be removed to change pull-ups, they are recommended for patients who do not need to change their incontinence products as frequently. Many patients who experience only intermittent incontinence will find that disposable pull-ups are a great option for times when they cannot quickly make it to a bathroom. Most pull up products have an elastic waistband for comfort and fit, making wearing them much less of an adjustment since they function much like normal undergarments.

Patients who experience intermittent or nighttime incontinence may choose disposable underpads, commonly called Chux, as their primary or secondary incontinence product. These absorbent and protectant disposable pads are frequently placed under the patient with incontinence in bed at night, on the sofa, or in a chair where they spend a great deal of time. With quilted absorbent layers on top and a protective leak-proof bottom, Chux provides the last line of defense against leaks onto mattresses or furniture, protecting these surfaces, and keeping the patient’s skin dry in order to aid with cleanup and bacteria prevention. Many patients with severe incontinence will utilize both Chux and a disposable brief or pull up in order to provide maximum protection against leaks and accidents.

Dealing with incontinence can be a radical life change, but it does not have to diminish a patient’s quality of life, or be a source of anxiety. Some insurance programs such as Medicaid will even pay for these products for patients with medically documented incontinence. If you are interested in qualifying for your incontinence products through insurance, you can simply complete our Qualify Through Insurance form. Upon submission, our Patient Care Representatives will work directly with your insurance provider and physician to determine your coverage and will contact you within 3-5 business days to discuss your incontinence options and shipment date.

Information provided on the Aeroflow Urology blog is not intended as a substitute to medical advice or care. Aeroflow recommends consulting your healthcare provider if you are experiencing medical issues relating to incontinence.

Catheterizing in Public Restrooms


Catheterizing in Public Restrooms


The process of adjusting to life with intermittent catheter use can be a major lifestyle adjustment for any patient, as well as their loved ones and caretakers. It can be a time-consuming, uncomfortable process, particularly at first, even in a patient’s home, with all supplies at hand and a feeling of sterility. However, the reality is, many patients who utilize catheters must frequently be out and about, living their normal lives, regardless of their medical conditions. Because of this fact, the process of catheterizing in a public restroom is a very important one to master. Though it can be a source of anxiety for patients, with proper preparation and education, catheterizing in public restrooms can be only marginally more difficult than doing so in the comfort of your own home.

There are two main issues that are the primary barriers to catheterizing in a public restroom. The first is having all the necessary supplies on hand in order to do so properly. Catheters, particularly male catheters, can consume a good deal of space. Many are too long to easily fit in a pocket or even a normal sized purse. Coupled with any sterilization and lubrication supplies, and it can be cumbersome to carry all the necessary supplies to properly catheterize in a public restroom. This can lead to patients skipping catheterization and trying to hold out until they get home, which can lead to bladder damage and other serious complications. Patients should always catheterize at the same frequency as their physician recommends. Many men find that carrying catheters and supplies in a briefcase can be helpful, as well as providing a hard surface on which to place the supplies during catheterization. For women, folding catheters into a U-shape can help them accommodate varying sizes of purses. Additionally, there are compact catheters available and intended for discretion and space, depending on your insurance and medical qualifications, such as the Coloplast Speedicath.

The other main obstacle to properly catheterizing in a public restroom is the aspect of sterility and hygiene. Complications such as urinary tract infections (UTI’s) can be one risk of catheterization, as the process can introduce bacteria directly into the body if not done properly and safely. Obviously, public restrooms are much less hygienic than the restroom in your home. The first and most obvious line of defense in avoiding health complications due to catheterizing in a public restroom is frequent, thorough handwashing. After washing hands, patients should make their way to a stall or private area in order to actually catheterize. Pushing and pulling with your elbow or foot can help preserve the sanitation of your hands. Patients should utilize a drape, paper towel, or some other more sanitary surface to place their supplies on. Many catheter systems can include these supplies or convenient alternatives. For example, Hollister catheters have an adhesive dot on the side of the catheter, enabling patients to stick the outer packaging of the catheter to any surface, while preserving the sanitation of the catheter itself. Gloves, if available, can be a great second line of defense for patients catheterizing in public restrooms. If a patient’s catheter includes a grip or guide strip, this should be utilized, so as not to touch the catheter tube itself which can lead to contamination.

If patients prepare properly and take a heightened degree of caution, catheterizing in public restrooms does not need to be a source of anxiety. With advances in medical technology and a trusted supplier on your side, you can utilize a catheterization program without sacrificing any quality of life. With an experienced supplier like Aeroflow Healthcare on your side, you never have to worry about dealing with insurance, learning about supplies, or picking up your supplies in a store.

Information provided on the Aeroflow Urology blog is not intended as a substitute to medical advice or care. Aeroflow recommends consulting your healthcare provider if you are experiencing medical issues relating to incontinence.

Diapers or Pull-Ups? Which is Right For Me?

Of the many challenging health concerns that a person may deal with over the course of their life, few are as inconvenient and sensitive as incontinence. In adjusting to life with incontinence, many patients will find that their already difficult situation can be further complicated by the sheer wealth of options that exist to mitigate the symptoms of incontinence. This is true even in the category of disposable underwear products.

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What is an External Catheter?



In exploring options to deal with urinary incontinence, many patients find the use of intermittent catheters to be a daunting prospect. The use of incontinence products, in general, can be a great adjustment for patients who have conditions which necessitate their use. For men, due to possible physiological obstructions and difficulties, intermittent self-catheterization can be particularly intimidating. In cases such as this, many men will explore options which do not require traditional catheterization.

What is an External Catheter


The external or condom catheter is a considerably less invasive form of catheterization than most intermittent catheter systems. Condom catheters use a latex or rubber shell to encase the tip of the penis and connect directly to a drain bag most commonly strapped to the inner thigh. Because no part of the catheter enters the patient’s urethra, there is considerably less risk of damage to the urethra, as well as infection which can stem from improper hygiene practices during catheterization. In fact, a 2006 study by the American Journal of Geriatrics found that patients utilizing external or condom catheters were nearly 40% less likely to develop a UTI than compared with those patients on a program of intermittent catheterization.

One of the most common concurrent health concerns for men with urinary incontinence is an enlarged prostate. This condition can make standard straight intermittent catheters nearly impossible to utilize with any degree of success. Many men may even find the coude tip catheter, which is often prescribed for just such a complication, to be difficult to successfully insert multiple times a day. For patients who have difficulty with the process, the convenience and ease of an external catheter may be preferable.

One of the main benefits of external catheterization is discretion and convenience. Because they must be changed considerably less frequently than most types of intermittent catheters, condom catheters can greatly reduce overall trips to the bathroom for patients utilizing them. Whereas many types of intermittent catheters must be changed multiple times a day, condom catheters are changed most often once daily. Catheterization can often require patients to plan ahead in order to ascertain discrete and sanitary locations for them to catheterize. This can be particularly cumbersome when traveling or attending long events such as sporting events or conferences. In cases such as these, the larger volume of a condom catheter and the ease of utilizing it without as much upkeep and maintenance can make external catheters very appealing.

Urinary incontinence can be a major life adjustment, but it does not have to be painful, difficult, or embarrassing. When supported and educated properly, many patients can maintain their previous quality of life even when utilizing catheter products. Men with urinary incontinence should consider the possibility of external catheter use even sporadically when conditions such as travel or events necessitate it.

Information provided on the Aeroflow Urology blog is not intended as a substitute to medical advice or care. Aeroflow recommends consulting your healthcare provider if you are experiencing medical issues relating to incontinence.

What is Purple Bag Syndrome, and How To Prevent It


What is Purple Bag Syndrome, and How To Prevent It


If you're catheterized and recently checked on your urinary bag to notice a distinct purple hue to the contents, don't be alarmed. While rare, there is an explanation as to why your urine has changed color, and ways to help prevent this from happening again.

Purple Bag Syndrome typically occurs in individuals on long-term urinary catheterization and is related to a urinary tract infection. When certain types of bacteria cause a urinary tract infection, they can react with the breakdown of tryptophan (the same stuff found in turkey, and many other foods) in your digestive system, and the resulting reaction causes the purple discoloration.

While the sight of Purple Bag Syndrome may be alarming, there is no immediate cause to be worried or concerned. Typically, it is harmless and does not indicate any larger issue.

In order to prevent Purple Bag Syndrome, it is very important to regularly change and properly take care of all catheters and drainage bags to prevent the future growth of bacteria. Proper sanitation and maintenance of your medical supplies will help prevent not only Purple Bag Syndrome, but also promote a healthier life.

Sometimes other symptoms, such as constipation, follow Purple Bag Syndrome, and should be treated accordingly. Even though Purple Bag Syndrome is a benign reaction to bacteria and tryptophan, it may be beneficial to inform your healthcare provider so that they can check for any underlying concerns.

Whether you need an indwelling catheter, intermittent catheter, or external catheter, Aeroflow is here for you. Our staff will work with your insurance to find the best supplies to fit your needs in accordance to your doctor's notes.

Information provided on the Aeroflow Urology blog is not intended as a substitute to medical advice or care. Aeroflow recommends consulting your healthcare provider if you are experiencing medical issues relating to incontinence.